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  • GPB Radio | Augusta

    WACG90.7 FM

    (706) 737-1661







    Click here for more station information

  • GPB Radio | Augusta

    WACG90.7 FM

    (706) 737-1661







    Click here for more station information

  • GPB Radio | Augusta

    WACG90.7 FM

    (706) 737-1661







    Click here for more station information

  • GPB Radio | Augusta

    WACG90.7 FM

    (706) 737-1661







    Click here for more station information

  • GPB Radio | Augusta

    WACG90.7 FM

    (706) 737-1661







    Click here for more station information

  • GPB Radio | Augusta

    WACG90.7 FM

    (706) 737-1661







    Click here for more station information

Latest Augusta News

Georgia Looks To Alabama For 2018 Lessons

On this edition of Political Rewind: Georgia political leaders are examining the results of the Alabama senate race to determine whether there are lessons for how to run in 2018 races here. Our panel will look at what Alabama may teach us about elections next year. The Kennesaw state cheerleader protests lead to the ouster of Sam Olens as president of KSU. How did it all happen. What does Olens' resignation mean for the future of the university, and for the future of the man who was once one of the most promising rising stars in Georgia politics? Find out on this episode of "Political Rewind." Plus: Georgia senate Democrats introduce a bill they say will provide all Georgian equal access to the internet in the aftermath of the FCC decision to end net neutrality. And we’ll update you on President Trump’s latest remarks about the Mueller Russia investigation and his continuing criticisms of the FBI Panelists: Jim Galloway, AJC Political Writer Teresa Tomlinson, Mayor of Columbus, Georgia
December 15, 2017

Kristian Bush On Sugarland's 2018 Reunion

On today's episode of “Two Way Street,” we talk to Sugarland artist Kristian Bush . He and his musical partner, Jennifer Nettles , have been on hiatus since 2013 but recently announced that they will be getting back together for a 2018 tour . We talk to him about Sugarland’s long-anticipated reunion, but since this is a holiday show, we start by talking to Kristian about his passion for Christmas music. He tells us what Christmas was like growing up in Dolly Parton’s hometown Sevierville , Tennessee. Kristian’s childhood coincided with a time in Sevierville when tourism became a cornerstone of the local economy. And thus, his early Christmas memories revolve around the light shows and other holiday tourist attractions. “Christmas music is a fantastic passion of mine,” Kristian tells us. His songwriting process, however, is a little bit different than most musicians who write holiday music: he writes his Christmas songs during the fall instead of in June or July. “So right now, I am
December 14, 2017

Ralston Talks Legislative Session

On this edition of "Political Rewind," as the 2018 Georgia legislative session approaches, we’re joined by Speaker of the House of Representatives David Ralston. What does he see as the most compelling issues legislators will face? What about a plan to deal with sexual harassment under the Gold Dome? Will the speaker once again look to tamp down efforts to pass a religious liberty bill? And, what about the calls for the legislature to relinquish control over the fate of Confederate markers in local communities? Panelists: AJC Political Reporter Greg Bluestein Georgia House Speaker David Ralston
December 13, 2017

Georgia Commission May Vote Next Week On Vogtle Reactors

The state agency that regulates utilities could decide next week whether to complete two new nuclear reactors at Plant Vogtle or cancel the project that's been plagued by delays and escalating costs. Georgia Power estimates the reactors will cost $12.2 billion and won't be finished until 2021 and 2022. The new reactors on the Savannah River near Waynesboro were initially expected to cost the company about $6 billion and be completed this year. The state Public Service Commission has to decide whether the reactors are still a good deal for ratepayers, who would bear much of the cost. The PSC's analysts say it's not, arguing the project's current price tag is $3.9 billion more than what they consider reasonable. A vote by the PSC on whether to move forward was expected in February. But PSC Chairman Stan Wise told The Augusta Chronicle the commission plans to vote Dec. 21. Wise said Georgia Power wants a decision now so that, if the project gets cancelled, the company could take advantage
December 12, 2017